Up at SFMoMA blog!
sfmoma:

SUBMISSION:
NEW WORK: Surface Markings
© Kameelah Janan Rasheed, 2012 // www.kameelahr.com // Brooklyn, NY (originally from East Palo Alto, CA)
Surface Markings explores the ways in which time and location are inscribed not on the photographic images themselves, but on the patterns and texts imprinted on the backs of photographs. Found in my 80 year old grandmothers living room this summer, the back of these photographs are traces of specific times or situations that function as indexical links to uncertainty, hidden memories, and fictions.The patterns created by hardened glue and torn paper residue not only inscribe time, they also inscribe location. Attempts to remove a photo from its original location in an album create patterns that allude to spatial dislocation. The resulting patterns from torn paper and glue mimic the surfaces of the earth — borders, bodies of water, island formations, and mountains. Hand-written notes and imprints from photograph developing machines function as cartographic markings. These maps drawn on the back of these photographs do not articulate specific tangible locations; rather, they map vague memories.

Up at SFMoMA blog!

sfmoma:

SUBMISSION:

NEW WORK: Surface Markings

© Kameelah Janan Rasheed, 2012 // www.kameelahr.com // Brooklyn, NY (originally from East Palo Alto, CA)

Surface Markings explores the ways in which time and location are inscribed not on the photographic images themselves, but on the patterns and texts imprinted on the backs of photographs. Found in my 80 year old grandmothers living room this summer, the back of these photographs are traces of specific times or situations that function as indexical links to uncertainty, hidden memories, and fictions.

The patterns created by hardened glue and torn paper residue not only inscribe time, they also inscribe location. Attempts to remove a photo from its original location in an album create patterns that allude to spatial dislocation. The resulting patterns from torn paper and glue mimic the surfaces of the earth — borders, bodies of water, island formations, and mountains. Hand-written notes and imprints from photograph developing machines function as cartographic markings. These maps drawn on the back of these photographs do not articulate specific tangible locations; rather, they map vague memories.